Notte di Tempesta

Soprano Claire Meghnagi, oboist Shai Kribus and the Barrocade Ensemble perform virtuoso arias by Handel and Vivaldi concerti for oboe and recorder

“Virtuoso opening – “Da Tempesta” from Giulio Cesarea. Claire Meghnagi possesses a beautiful, crystal clear powerful voice, and delightful contemporary baroque style: beautiful ornaments and vibrato control all in the exact right amount… gorgeous sound. I especially loved the two arias sequence: first lyric – “Wil the sun forget to streak” from Solomon, and immediately after the virtuoso coloratura aria “Che non puo la Gelosia” from Aci, Galatea e Polifemo… floated in Meghnagi’s performance in spectacular ease and lightness. The audience demanded an anchor… Claire Meghnagi sang with much gleam and grace, and Barrocade’s period instruments polished playing, full of rhythm and energy, showed how beautifully music crosses the limits of time. “A. Madel, Ha’aretz

“Outstanding in particular is Aci’s aria Qui l’Augel da Pianta in Pianta (Aci, Galatea e Polifemo)… this stunning yet highly demanding aria, very high in tessitura, is performed by Meghnagi with remarkable sensitivity and extraordinary technique. Overall, Meghnagi’s singing demonstrates how even intimate, quiet sentimental moments can be full of drama, like the Queen of Sheba’s aria Will the Sun forget to Streak from Solomon, as the queen departs from Solomon” E.Uzan, Yediot Achronot

Virtuosity in the late Baroque period was an intricate issue. On the one hand, its outward appearance is simple: the public attending the opera or a concert demanded to be overwhelmed by performers’ technique. On the other hand, virtuosity served as a vehicle for profound drama; it provided imitation (of natural phenomena such as birds or storms, or instruments attempting to sound like voices and vice versa) and it often revealed composers’ command over their craft. Supplying tailor-made arias for a star singer or concertos for a gifted performer, composers were often expected to demand all the special effects and tricks that performers had up their sleeve. For Handel and Vivaldi, such circumstances did not hinder inspiration.

This project was first recorded on CD released by the prestigious baroque label FraBernardo in Autria, 2016.

Claire Meghnagi, Soprano

Shai Kribus, Oboe/Recorder

Barrocade the Israeli baroque collective